November 2014

  • Girl Holding Candle
     Sudipto Das
    India

    Sudipto Das lives in Kolkata, India. He is a self-taught photographer, now working as a senior photojournalist for The Times of India. Sudipto’s photographs have been displayed around the world including in Washington, DC, Indonesia, Amsterdam, London, Portugal, Germany, Singapore, UAE, Montreal, Vancouver and Switzerland. He has received more than 100 international photography awards from all over the world.

    In this image, a woman from a Muslim community holds a poster on a busy Kolkata street, demanding justice for a rape victim in her area.

    The Allard Prize Photography Competition jury selected this photograph as it represents the courage it takes to stand up for what one believes in the fight for human rights.

  • Villagers holding case law
     Katharina Hesse
    China

    Katharina Hesse is a Beijing-based photographer who has worked throughout Asia for nearly two decades. Her work primarily focuses on China’s social concerns, among them youth and urban culture, religion and North Korean refugees.

    In this photograph, petitioners from the countryside in China hold out copies of their legal cases. In the past decades, hundreds of thousands of Chinese from the provinces have descended upon Beijing in hopes of attracting attention from higher authorities regarding their civil law cases. These cases vary from work accidents, violence against family members, murder, extortion, and the majority of them stem from a corrupt rural legal system. The tradition of petitioning to higher authorities in the Chinese capital reaches back to Imperial times.  Outside the city center of Beijing, petitioners’ villages have sprung up, as those seeking justice face long delays in being heard.  The petitioners face tremendous obstacles in having their cases heard including overworked authorities, lack of legal aid and police trying to prevent the cases from being brought.

    The Allard Prize Photography Competition jury selected this photograph as it reflects the importance of upholding the Rule of Law and ensuring societies are governed by a transparent and non-corrupt legal system.

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  • The first gay Imam
     Jonathan Alpeyrie
    United States

    Jonathan Alpeyrie was born in France and lives in the United States. He has worked as a freelance photographer for various publications and websites, including the Sunday Times, Le Figaro magazine, American Photo, and the BBC, and is currently a photographer for Polaris Images. His career spans over a decade and has taken him to more than 25 countries where he has covered 12 conflict zone assignments in the Middle East and North Africa, The South Caucasus and Central Asia.

    In 2013, he was abducted in Syria and held for 81 days until a ransom was paid for his release.

    This photograph is of the first openly gay Imam, Daayiee Abdullah, who is based in Washington, DC.  For him, Islam is a religion of peace and tolerance, but his sexuality is viewed as incompatible with Islam. Most Imams in the United States and abroad are against his openness about his sexuality and have severely condemned him.  Many have asked him to stop preaching and to renounce Islam.  Even Islam, the most conservative monotheist religion in the world, has been touched by this important human rights issue.

    The Allard Prize Photography Competition Jury selected this photograph for its reflection of a lone fight and courageous leadership within a major religious organization for tolerance of an oppressed minority.”

  • Boys and men carrying mud in open space
     Greg Constantine
    Myanmar

    Greg Constantine is a freelance photographer from the United States.  Since 2005, he has worked on the long-term project “Nowhere People”, which documents ethnic minority groups around the world who have had their citizenship stripped or denied and are stateless.  His work has been published widely and exhibitions of his work have been held in: Washington, DC, Brussels, Tokyo, Geneva, London, Bangkok, Jakarta, Dublin, The Hague and at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City.

    This photograph features the Rohingya of Myanmar, a Muslim minority numbering nearly one million people who have been called the most oppressed people in the world.  The Myanmar government has refused to recognize them as citizens and, as such, they are without civil and human rights. Among the human rights denied to them is access to formal education. This image depicts a 7 year-old child who is hauling mud at a worksite with other Rohingya men near one of the internally displaced persons (“IDP”) camps. The mud will be used to construct a man-made dam and pond so Rohingya IDPs can catch fish and sell them to other camps. The child does not go to school and is paid less than $1 a day.

    The Allard Prize Photography Competition jury selected this photograph as it reflects the impact on a population denied one of the most basic human rights – citizenship. 

  • Waiting for Justice 3 - Arms
     Fernando Moleres
    Sierra Leone

    Fernando Moleres lives in Barcelona, Spain. He is a self-taught freelance photographer. His work has taken him to more than 30 countries around the world. Focusing on social issues, including the plight of refugees from Kurdistan, Sahara and Rwanda and juvenile African prisons, he has received many photography awards worldwide.

    This photograph was taken in Freetown, Sierra Leone. It shows some of the dozens of prisoners taken to court each morning from Pademba Road Prison. Many of them need to go to court many times before a decision is final, and end up as a remand prisoner for years before their sentence is decided.

    The Allard Prize Photography Competition jury selected this photograph as it depicts an unforgiving existence for prisoners when they are denied their human rights.

     

  • Waiting for Justice 2 - Faces behind bars
     Fernando Moleres
    Sierra Leone

    Fernando Moleres lives in Barcelona, Spain. He is a self-taught freelance photographer. His work has taken him to more than 30 countries around the world. Focusing on social issues, including the plight of refugees from Kurdistan, Sahara and Rwanda and juvenile African prisons, he has received many photography awards worldwide.

    This photograph was taken in Freetown, Sierra Leone at Pademba Road Prison. Over 30 juveniles are serving sentences there, contrary to the laws of Sierra Leone, instead of being placed in remand homes or approved schools. The prison was built to hold 300 prisoners but now has over 1,000 prisoners. Many of them suffer violence and sexual exploitation.

    The Allard Prize Photography Competition jury selected this photograph for its reflection of the need to ensure the transparency and openness of the criminal justice system.  It serves as a reminder of the human rights violations that can flow from an unjust prison system.